A Biblical Approach to Human Psychology

If someone were to ask you about the Bible and its connection to and application to human psychology, I believe most of us would express with some confidence the answer would be “None, there is no Biblical approach to human psychology.” We do not claim that the Bible provides explicit directions for counseling. Rather, the argument can be made that the Bible provides the general principles on which we must build, and, accordingly, build into our approach to human psychology. “All scripture is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work.” (2 Tim. 3:16-17). The second epistle to Timothy instructs us that the knowledge, wisdom and skills found in God’s Word can be incorporated into psychological theory.

Read More
Dr. Karen W. Royer
The Summer Institutes at Celebration: Preparing High School Students in the Greater Austin Area for College Readiness and Success

College readiness can be defined as ‘the level of knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary to enroll in credit-bearing courses at a post-secondary institution, to persist to graduation and secure employment’.[1] Recent reports indicate that the college readiness of high school students attending publicly funded schools in the Greater Austin area continues to deteriorate, despite varying measures introduced by school districts to combat the declining levels of students prepared for college and work upon graduation.[2] Most of the strategies implemented by school districts to help students prepare for life after high school primarily focus on academic coursework preparation and educational testing.[3] However, studies have shown that solving the college readiness problem requires much more than academic preparation and the battery of college entrance and placement examinations. Students also need to develop non-cognitive and interpersonal skills to navigate and complete college successfully. [4]

Read More
Dr. Tolu Osoba
Clicks and Mortar

In 1857, British author Charles Dickens was first to use the phrase “Bricks and Mortar” (1982, 6, 9) in his novel Little Dorrit. He coined the expression to refer to businesses and schools as physical buildings. In his novel, Dickens challenged the idea of business and educational institutions. Bricks and mortar were the places where employers and employees went to work and the colleges, universities, and seminaries where professors and students went to teach and learn. However, 161 years later, an amendment to the phrase has been made, especially with reference to higher education; in place of “bricks and mortar,” we now read of “clicks and mortar.”

Read More
Dr. Andrew K. Fox
Leadership in the Marketplace: How Leadership Education and Experience is Influencing the Success of Students and Organizations

Leaders are faced with many challenges in the marketplace, one of the most critical is in the selection of the right employees (Vogel, 2017).  The process of hiring and bringing on employees is one of the most vital aspects of any organization and poor selections can be quite costly.  In fact, selecting the wrong employee can add substantial financial costs to a company with many employers estimating those cost somewhere between 25K – 50K dollars (Hall, 2012).  This cost and importance have contributed to an ever-varied approach to hiring and then training in order to find the best candidate and employee (Reed, 2016).  In my experience, it is not only important to make the right selection it is equally as important to retain and train those employees, especially those looking to advance into leadership roles.  According to the Corporate Executive Board, 66% of companies invest in programs that aim to identify high-potential employees.  Even with all of that training only 13% of those same companies have confidence in their rising leaders and have not figured out how to fully develop their prospective senior managers and executives (Fernandez-Araoz, Roscoe, & Aramaki, 2017)

Read More
Dr. Matt Cohen
The Educational Model towards Career Direction in the Marketplace

College graduates often leave university with the hope of securing a well-paying job in their chosen discipline, following graduation. However, research shows that many new graduates, particularly those with Bachelor’s degrees, struggle to find suitable employment. Studies have also shown that prior to graduation, students have challenges in making informed career choices, mainly due to the lack of information on career paths and opportunities in various industries. Without access to real world work experience, college students, as new graduates, face unemployment or underemployment, and must tackle the barriers which hinder them from securing long-term, paid employment.

Read More
Dr. Tolu Osoba
Southeastern University at Celebration Church: Why? And Why Now?

Every institution has a history. Numerical growth and operational expansion of any institution begins somewhere with someone. Southeastern University began in 1935 through J.C. Thames and had seventeen students in its first graduating class. The University relocated five times with six name changes before receiving accreditation with the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges in 1986. Today, Southeastern University has over 5,500 students and continues to grow numerically and expand operationally across the United States under the leadership of Dr. Kent Ingle. Celebration Church began in 2000 under the leadership of Pastors Joe and Lori Champion. What began with seventy people meeting in a library has since progressed through seven locations and today has an average weekend attendance of 6,000 people flourishing under the continued leadership of the Champions.

Read More
Dr. Andrew K. Fox